Emergency Supply Kits

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Emergencies can occur when you are at home, at work, on vacation, or just out and about. Are you prepared for an emergency no matter where you are?  

Be prepared: always have important supplies with you.

Disability-specific supplies for emergency kits/go kits

Prepare different kits for different places and situations:

  • Carry-on-you kit is for the essential items you need to keep with you at all times.
  • Grab-and-go kit is an easy-to-carry kit you can grab if you have to leave home in a hurry. It has the things you cannot do without and that you can carry and use without help from someone else.
  • Home kit includes water, food, first aid supplies, clothing and bedding, tools, emergency supplies, and disability-specific items. It includes all the things you would most likely need if you had to be on your own for days either at home or in an evacuation shelter.
  • Bedside kit has items you may need if you are trapped in or near your bed and unable to get to other parts of your home.
  • Car kit has items you will need if you have to evacuate the area and/or are in or near your vehicle during an emergency.

Tailor the contents of these kits to your needs and abilities. Do what works for you, thinking about the type of emergencies that can happen where you live, work and go to school. For example, the bedside kit includes medications because there is a chance that in some emergencies, such as an earthquake or power outage, people can be trapped in their beds.

You should plan for enough supplies to last for up to two weeks (medication, syringes, ostomy bags, catheters, padding, etc.). Do what is realistic for you. Know what you are able to carry in a fanny pack, backpack, or drawstring bag hung from a wheelchair, scooter, or other mobility device. If you can only carry a 3-day supply of insulin in your Grab-and-Go kit, then that is what’s right for you. Plan for what you can do.

Store kits in a waterproof container in a specific place so they are easy to find. Keep important items in an easy to reach and safe place, so you can quickly and easily access them. (These items might include dentures, hearing aids, prostheses, canes, crutches, walkers, wheelchairs, respirators, communication devices, artificial larynx, sanitary aids, batteries, eye glasses, contact lenses with cleaning solutions, etc.)

Below are tables that summarize many of the supplies needed and a checklist for each type of kit. If you know you will need other items in an emergency that are not on these lists, be sure to add them to your kits.

 

Table of Contents

  1. Emergency Supply Kits

  2. Carry-on-You Emergency Supply Kit List

  3. Grab-and-Go Emergency Supply Kit Checklist

  4. Home Kit Emergency Supply Checklist

  5. Bedside Kit Emergency Supply Checklist

  6. Car Kit Emergency Supplies Checklist


Emergency Supply Kits

Checklist

Item

Carry on You

Grab and Go

Home

Bedside

Car

Important Papers:

Emergency health information

X

X

X

X

X

Copies of emergency contacts list adapacific.org/emergency/checklists.php

X

X

X

X

X

Copies of current prescriptions

X

X

X

 

 

Other important items:

Cell phone

X

 

X

X

 

Cell phone charger

X

X

X

 

X

Cash

X

 

X

 

 

Essential medications

X

 

 

X

 

Other medications

 

 

X

 

 

Flashlights and extra batteries, light sticks

 

 

X

X

X

Extra batteries for oxygen, breathing devices, hearing aids, cochlear implants, cell phones, radios, smart phones, and other mobile wireless devices like tablets.

X

X

X

 

 

Emergency food and water

 

X

X

X

X

Assorted sizes of re-closeable plastic bags for storing, food, waste, etc.

 

X

X

X

X

Sturdy work gloves to protect your hands from sharp objects you may need to lift or touch by mistake while moving over glass and rubble.

 

X

X

X

 

Lightweight flashlight (on key ring)

X

 

 

 

 

Small battery-operated radio and extra batteries

 

X

 

X

 

Signaling device you can use to attract attention if you need emergency assistance (whistle, horn, beeper, bell(s), screecher alarm system.)

X

X

 

X

 

A container that can be attached to the bed or nightstand (with cord or Velcro) to hold hearing aids, eye glasses, cell phones, etc.; oxygen tank attached to the wall and wheelchair locked and close to bed. This helps prevent supplies from falling, flying, or rolling away during an earthquake, hurricane, or other jarring, jolting event.

 

 

 

X

 

Road flares

 

 

 

 

X

Blankets or emergency blankets (lightweight, folded to pocket size, made of a reflective material which reflects up to 80% of your radiant body heat to help keep you warm).

 

 

 

 

X

Tools (screwdriver, pliers, wire, pocket knife, can opener, duct tape).

 

 

 

 

X

First aid kit and first aid book

 

 

X

 

X

Battery jumper cables

 

 

 

 

X

Reflective vest

 

 

 

 

X

Rain poncho

 

 

 

 

X

Wheelchair or Scooter Users

 

 

 

 

 

Keep mobility equipment close to you and secured so you can get to it quickly.

 

 

 

X

 

Recharging devices that can be connected to vehicle to charge a battery.

 

 

X

 

X

If available, keep a lightweight manual wheelchair for backup.

 

 

X

 

 

Speech or Communication Issues

 

 

 

 

 

If you use a laptop computer for communication, consider getting a power converter that plugs into the cigarette lighter or accessory outlet of a vehicle.

 

X

 

 

X

Hearing Issues

 

 

 

 

 

Carry a pre-printed copy of important personal statements with you such as “I use American Sign Language (ASL),” “I do not write or read English well,” or “If you make announcements, please write them out simply for me or find an ASL interpreter.”

X

 

 

 

X

Consider getting a weather radio, with a visual/text display that warns of weather emergencies, or get applications for your smart phones and other mobile wireless devices like tablets.

 

 

X

X

 

Vision Issues

 

 

 

 

 

Mark your disaster supplies with fluorescent tape, large print, or braille.

 

X

X

X

 

Have cane repair equipment or a replacement cane.

 

 

X

 

 

Have high-powered flashlights with wide beams and extra batteries.

 

X

X

X

 

Allergies, Sensitivities, Breathing Conditions

 

 

 

 

 

Towels, masks, industrial respirators or other supplies you can use to filter your air supply.

X

X

X

X

 

N95 rated particulate filter mask – protects against dust, radiological dust, and biological agents.

 

 

X

X

 

Service Animals Supplies

 

 

 

 

 

Food, water, blankets, waste disposal bags, medication, harness, etc.

 

 

 

X

X

Return to Table of Contents


Carry-on-You Emergency Supply Kit List

The Carry-on-You Emergency Supply Kit is for essential items you need to keep with you at all times. Keep important items in your purse, briefcase, or backpack so you can quickly and easily access them.

Include items such as a cell phone, cell phone charger, cash, and medication. Use this checklist as a tool to ensure you have the necessary items in your Carry-on-You Emergency Supply Kit.

Date Done

Item

Notes

 

Important Papers:

 

 

Emergency health information

 

 

Copies of emergency contacts list adapacific.org/emergency/checklists.php

 

 

Copies of medication prescriptions

 

 

Other important items:

 

 

Cell phone and charger

 

 

Cash (small bills and change)

 

 

Important medications

 

 

Light weight small flashlight (on key ring)

 

 

Small whistle (on key ring) or other noise-making item to draw attention for emergency assistance

 

 

Small Sharpie™ pen (writes on anything)

 

 

Batteries, chargers, or power cords for critical devices, if possible

 

 

Wheelchair or Scooter Users:

 

 

A patch kit or can of "sealant" to repair flat tires and/or an extra supply of inner tubes for non-puncture-proof wheelchair/scooter tires.

 

 

Label your equipment with simple “how to use/move” instructions (for example, how to “free wheel” or “disengage the gears” of your power wheelchair). Attach label to equipment and cover it with clear mailing or packing tape.

 

 

Speech or Communication Needs:

 

 

A pre-printed copy of important personal statements, in text or pictures. Written details about who you are and what you will need to communicate with others.

 

 

Hearing Needs:

 

 

A pre-printed copy of important personal statements, such as:

  • "I use American Sign Language (ASL)."
  • "I do not write or read English well."
  • "If you make announcements, please write them out simply for me or find an ASL interpreter.”

 

 

Vision Needs:

 

 

Mark your disaster supplies with fluorescent tape, large print, or Braille.

 

 

Allergies, Sensitivities, Breathing Needs:

 

 

Towels, masks, industrial respirators or other supplies you can use to filter your air supply.

 

 Return to Table of Contents


Grab-and-Go Emergency Supply Kit Checklist

The Grab-and-Go Emergency Supply Kit is an easy to grab and carry if you have to leave home in a hurry. It has things you cannot do without that are light enough to carry with you. Keep important items in a bag or backpack so you can quickly and easily access them. Include items such as a cell phone charger, batteries, food, and water. Use this checklist as a tool to ensure you have the necessary items in your Grab-and-Go Emergency Supply Kit.

Date Done

Item

Notes

 

Important Papers:

 

 

Emergency health information

 

 

Copies of emergency contacts list adapacific.org/emergency/checklists.php

 

 

Copies of medication prescriptions

 

 

Other important items:

 

 

Cell phone charger

 

 

Extra batteries for oxygen, breathing devices, hearing aids, cochlear implants, cell phone, radios, smart phones and other mobile wireless devices like tablets

 

 

Small battery operated radio and extra batteries.

 

 

Emergency food and water

 

 

Assorted sizes of re-closeable plastic bags for storing food, waste, etc.

 

 

Sturdy work gloves to protect your hands from sharp objects you may need to lift or touch by mistake while moving over glass and rubble.

 

 

Signaling device you can use to attract attention if you need emergency assistance (whistle, horn, beeper, bell(s), screecher alarm system).

 

 

Wheelchair or Scooter Users:

 

 

A patch kit or can of "sealant" to repair flat tires and/or an extra supply of inner tubes for non-puncture-proof wheelchair/scooter tires.

 

 

Speech or Communication Needs:

 

 

If you use a laptop computer for communication, consider getting a power converter that plugs into the cigarette lighter or accessory outlet of a vehicle.

 

 

Vision Needs:

 

 

Mark your disaster supplies with fluorescent tape, large print, or Braille.

 

 

Have high-powered flashlights with wide beams and extra batteries.

 

 

Allergies, Sensitivities, Breathing Needs:

 

 

Towels, masks, industrial respirators or other supplies you can use to filter your air supply.

 

 

Service Animal Supplies:

 

 

Food, water, blankets, waste disposal bags, medication, harness, etc.

 

 Return to Table of Contents


Home Kit Emergency Supply Checklist

The Home Emergency Supply Kit contains items vital for daily living. It includes all the things you would most likely need if you had to be self-sufficient for days either at home or in an evacuation center.

Items in the Home Emergency Supply Kit include such essential items as water, medication, first aid supplies, tools, flashlight, and batteries.

Date Done

Item

Notes

 

Important Papers:

 

 

Emergency health information

 

 

Copies of emergency contacts list adapacific.org/emergency/checklists.php

 

 

Copies of medication prescriptions

 

 

Other important items:

 

 

Cell phone and charger

 

 

Cash (small bills and change)

 

 

Standard telephone (that does not need to be plugged into an electric outlet)

 

 

Other medications

 

 

Flashlights and extra batteries, light sticks

 

 

Emergency food

 

 

Assorted sizes of re-closeable plastic bags for storing food, waste, etc.

 

 

Extra batteries for oxygen, breathing devices, hearing aids, cochlear implants, cell phones, radios, smart phones and other mobile wireless devices like tablets

 

 

Sturdy work gloves to protect your hands from sharp objects you may need to lift or touch by mistake while moving over glass and rubble.

 

 

First aid kit and book

 

 

Wheelchair, Walker,  or Scooter Users:

 

 

Recharging devices that can be connected to a vehicle to charge a battery.

 

 

If available, keep a lightweight manual wheelchair for backup.

 

 

Hearing Needs:

 

 

Weather radio with a visual/text display that warns of weather emergencies or get an app for cell phone or tablet

 

 

Vision Needs:

 

 

Mark your disaster supplies with fluorescent tape, large print, or Braille.

 

 

Have cane repair equipment or a replacement cane.

 

 

High-powered flashlights with wide beams and extra batteries.

 

 

Allergies, Sensitivities, Breathing Needs:

 

 

Towels, masks, industrial respirators or other supplies you can use to filter your air supply.

 

 

N95 rated particulate filter mask – protects against dust, radiological dust, and biological agents.

 

 

Service Animal Supplies:

 

 

Food, water, blankets, waste disposal bags, medication, harness, etc.

 

 Return to Table of Contents


Bedside Kit Emergency Supply Checklist

The Bedside Emergency Supply Kit contains essential items you may need if you are trapped in or near your bed and unable to get to other parts of your home.

Keep important items in a nightstand next to your bed so you can quickly and easily reach them. Include items such as a cell phone, medication, water, and a flashlight in your Bedside Emergency Supply Kit. Use this checklist as a tool to ensure you have what you need in an emergency.

Date Done

Item

Notes

 

Important Papers:

 

 

Emergency health information and copies of your prescriptions

 

 

Copies of emergency contacts list adapacific.org/emergency/checklists.php

 

 

Other important items:

 

 

Cell phone and charger

 

 

Portable cell phone charger or power pack for extended power outages.

 

 

Standard telephone (that does not need to be plugged into an electric outlet)

 

 

Important medications

 

 

Flashlights and extra batteries, light sticks

 

 

Emergency food and water

 

 

Assorted sizes of re-closeable plastic bags for storing food, waste, etc.

 

 

Sturdy work gloves to protect your hands from sharp objects you may need to lift or touch by mistake while moving over glass and rubble.

 

 

Battery operated radio and extra batteries

 

 

Signaling device you can use to attract attention if you need emergency assistance (whistle, horn, beeper, bell(s), screecher alarm system).

 

 

A container that can be attached to the bed or nightstand (with cord or Velcro) to hold hearing aids, eye glasses, cell phones, etc.; oxygen tank attached to the wall and wheelchair locked and close to bed. This helps prevent supplies from falling, flying, or rolling away during an earthquake, hurricane, or other jarring, jolting event.

 

 

Wheelchair or Scooter Users:

 

 

Keep mobility equipment close to you and secured so you can get to it quickly.

 

 

Hearing Needs:

 

 

Weather radio with a visual/text display that warns of weather emergencies or an app for cell phone or tablet.

 

 

Vision Needs:

 

 

Mark your disaster supplies with fluorescent tape, large print, or braille.

 

 

High-powered flashlights with wide beams and extra batteries.

 

 

Allergies, Sensitivities, Breathing Needs:

 

 

Towels, masks, industrial respirators or other supplies you can use to filter your air supply.

 

 

N95 rated particulate filter mask – protects against dust, radiological dust, and biological agents.

 

 Return to Table of Contents


Car Kit Emergency Supplies Checklist

The Car Emergency Supply Kit contains items you will need if you have to evacuate the area and/or are in or near your vehicle during an emergency.

Keep important items in your trunk so you can quickly and easily access them. Include items such as a cell phone charger, batteries, road flares, jumper cables, and maps. Use the Checklist as a tool to ensure you have the necessary items in your Car Emergency Supply Kit.

Date Done

Item

Notes

 

Important Papers:

 

 

Emergency health information

 

 

Copies of emergency contacts list adapacific.org/emergency/checklists.php

 

 

Other important items:

 

 

Cell phone charger

 

 

Flashlights and extra batteries, light sticks

 

 

Emergency food and water

 

 

Assorted sizes of re-closeable plastic bags for storing food, waste, etc.

 

 

Road flares

 

 

First aid kit and first aid book

 

 

Blankets or emergency blankets (lightweight, folded to pocket size, made of a reflective material which reflects up to 80% of your radiant body heat to help keep you warm)

 

 

Tools (screwdriver, pliers, wire, pocket knife, can opener, duct tape, etc.)

 

 

Battery jumper cables

 

 

Reflective vest

 

 

Rain poncho

 

 

Printed state and local maps or a road atlas

 

 

Wheelchair or Scooter Users:

 

 

Recharging devices that can be connected to vehicle to charge a battery.

 

 

Speech or Communication Issues:

 

 

If you use a laptop computer for communication, consider getting a power converter that plugs into the cigarette lighter or accessory outlet of a vehicle.

 

Return to Table of Contents


For more information, call and speak to an ADA specialist at 1-800-949-4232. All calls are confidential.

Content was developed by the Pacfic ADA Center, and is based on professional consensus of ADA experts and the ADA National Network.

Toll Free: 1-800-949-4232
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Email:adatech@adapacific.org (link sends e-mail)
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The contents of this factsheet were developed under grants from the National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR grant numbers 90DP0081 and 90DP0086). NIDILRR is a Center within the Administration for Community Living (ACL), Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). The contents of this factsheet do not necessarily represent the policy of NIDILRR, ACL, HHS, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government.

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